Faramir’s commentary on Beowulf

Yesterday I posted on Tolkien’s admiration for the pagan “martial heroism as its own end” of Beowulf, yet which he immediately follows with his Christian caution towards the same: “But we may remember that the poet of Beowulf saw clearly: the wages of heroism is death.” In The Lord of the Rings, it is this same perspective that we found put in the mouth of Faramir, that most Christian and Tolkien-like of characters. Comparing and contrasting the Anglo-Saxon Rohirrim to his own people, the Gondorians, who are of a much higher and mightier lineage, Faramir says to Frodo:

‘Yet now, if the Rohirrim are grown in some ways more like to us, enhanced in arts and gentleness, we too have become more like to them, and can scarce claim any longer the title High. We are become Middle Men, of the Twilight, but with memory of other things. For as the Rohirrim do, we now love war and valour as things good in themselves, both a sport and an end; and though we still hold that a warrior should have more skills and knowledge than only the craft of weapons and slaying, we esteem a warrior, nonetheless, above men of other crafts. Such is the need of our days. So even was my brother, Boromir: a man of prowess, and for that he was accounted the best man in Gondor. And very valiant indeed he was: no heir of Minas Tirith has for long years been so hardy in toil, so onward into battle, or blown a mightier note on the Great Horn.’ Faramir sighed and fell silent for a while.

Much of the significance of Faramir’s courtship of Eowyn, it might be said, lies in his “converting”–indeed, healing and saving–this courageous but fey “shieldmaiden” of Rohan from her noble but pagan (and so ultimately enervating and no less nihilistic) martial obsession.

‘I stand in Minas Anor, the Tower of the Sun,’ she said; ‘and behold the Shadow has departed! I will be a shieldmaiden no longer, nor vie with the great Riders, nor take joy only in the songs of slaying. I will be a healer, and love all things that grow and are not barren.’ And again she looked at Faramir. ‘No longer do I desire to be a queen,’ she said.

     Then Faramir laughed merrily. ‘That is well,’ he said, ‘for I am not a king. Yet I will wed with the White Lady of Rohan, if it be her will. And if she will, then let us cross the River and in happier days let us dwell in fair Ithilien and there make a garden. All things will grow with joy there, if the White Lady comes.’

     ‘Then must I leave my own people, man of Gondor?’ she said. ‘And would you have your proud folk say of you: “There goes a lord who tamed a wild shieldmaiden of the North! Was there no woman of the race of Númenor to choose?”‘

     ‘I would,’ said Faramir.

Therein, I submit, lies much of Tolkien’s Christian response to Nietzsche: it is not ultimately the agonistic will-to-power, but the pastoral will-to-garden, that is the cure for modern nihilism.

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2 thoughts on “Faramir’s commentary on Beowulf

  1. An entertaining read. In my view, since life is entirely our perception, meaning is also entirely our perception. As perceivers, we will assign meaning where we will, and yet if we do not perceive our own self-value, we will not assign value to our perceptions, and life will appear meaningless through the lens of our cognitive distortions (I am assuming inherent value here, and suggesting that anything else but recognition of it, is due to cognitive distortion).

    That said, some may come to realize what they value precisely because of their initial agonistic thrust. In other words, their attraction to, valuing of, and love for, a pastoral approach, is part of the healing direction that was desired because of their early agonistic direction.

    This doesn’t happen in all cases, but I wanted to suggest here that, of the two directions you wrote about, agonistic and pastoral, the latter is not always superior to the former as a cure for nihilism, but rather the former can lead to the latter, and for some is a necessary step in personal expansion; that the latter is sometimes more appreciated when one has walked in the shoes of the former; and ultimately, nihilism ceases to exist as we recognize the value of our individual, and collective spirits.

  2. Pingback: Heroes, Hobbits & Hope in the Bible & Tolkien’s Middle-earth | Lingua Divina

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